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and of the opposition. >> brown: then, we update the growing unrest in egypt where the islamist-dominated assembly fast-tracked a vote on a new constitution. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. tonight, arizona republican, jeff flake. >> >> we're at a point on the fiscal issues where we have to reach an agreement and perhaps as we do so that will start the stage for the other areas as well. >> brown: fred de sam lazaro has the story of a minnesota non- profit that celebrates diversity and the power of dance. >> they're one of the few companies that within their own work spans so many kinds of different style, from classical ballet to modern dance to contemporary performance to urban dance. >> suarez: and we look at college sports teams, moving from conference to conference, playing a game of musical chairs where the end goal is more money from lucrative tv contracts. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred
protests throughout the muslim world today after friday prayers came to an end. in egypt, crowds in cairo and alexandria waved palestinian flags and chanted anti-israeli slogans. thousands of people also turned out in yemen to denounce the israeli offensive. and in turkey, a one-time israeli ally, people in istanbul called for the death of the jewish state. >> brown: and for more on the conflict, we are joined by hisham melham, washington bureau chief for al- arabiya; and dan schueftan is director of national security studies center at the university of haifa. gentlemen, one thing i think a lot of people, myself included are wondering how did this flare-up seemingly so quickly. dan schueftan. >> well, since hamas took over we had for a while a thousand rockets per year, then came israeli escalation and-- and it went down to a small number of rockets every year, last year again we came to about a thousand rockets against israel. and this intensified in recent weeks to the point where israel had to take action. israel was saying for about two weeks, i mean people here were dealing with the
's tahrir square and elsewhere in egypt today, sparked when president mohamed morsi granted himself broad new powers. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the widespread demonstrations, and assess what's behind the egyptian leader's moves. >> brown: then, the death toll in syria's 20-month war has climbed past 40,000, according to a human rights group. we get an update from margaret warner, reporting from the turkish border. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. judy woodruff talks with virginia democrat tim kaine. >> i intend to hit the ground on january 3 very much running. > running. we can make progress quickly if we listen to each other and find those points of common ground they think do exist. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> suarez: spencer michels has the story of a growing crackdown on dissidents and journalists in iran. >> brown: and we close with poet jennifer fitzgerald on hurricane sandy's destructive path through her home town of staten
station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: egypt's leaders tried today to mediate a truce between israel and hamas, but there was no outward sign of progress. instead, the two sides traded hundreds more air strikes and rocket attacks. in gaza, palestinians reported more than 100 people killed so far, more than half of them civilians. we have two reports from independent television news, beginning with john ray in gaza. (gunfire). >> reporter: two sides talking peace but conducting a war. fairly a lull in hostilities before an israeli air strike killed another militant leader inside a building used by local and world media. this was already the day of the dead when bodies followed bodies from morgue to cemetery shrouded in the green flag of hamas and carried along on a seething river of fury. no surrender, this man shouts. it's either us or israel in this land. these are the dead from one family: four children who died with their father and mother, their aunts and their sisters. the house where they lived and perished in an instant has been wiped from the earth, whether thi
between the two sides were put off for now. egypt's foreign minister, mohammed kamel amr, announced the breakthrough with secretary of state hillary clinton at his side. >> egypt has exerted efforts and conducted intensive discussions since the renewed outbreak of hostilities in the gaza strip with all parties: the palestinian leadership, the these efforts and communications managed to reach an agreement to a ceasefire and the return of calm and halt of the violence and the bloodshed that was witnessed recently. >> the united states welcomes the agreement today for a ceasefire in gaza. for it to hold, the rocket attacks must end, a broader calm returned. in the days ahead, the united states will work with partners across region to consolidate this progess, improve conditions for the people of gaza, provide security for the people of israel. >> woodruff: a short time later this afternoon, israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu told reporters he leaves open the possibility of a ground invasion of gaza at a later date, but agreeing to a ceasefire made sense now. >> i know there are
with the political crisis in egypt. >> suarez: then, in her final report from turkey, margaret warner looks at the growing clout of syria's kurdish minority, and the impact that's having on the other side of the border. >> brown: when does a co-worker count as a supervisor? that question was before the supreme court today in a case about harassment. marcia coyle explains. >> suarez: and we examine new figures from the pew research center showing that young voters played a decisive role reelecting president obama. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: a still tentative american e
point in this conflict but i would say the one who has really gained influence is egypt. here is egypt. prior to the time that the new egypt emerged in the last years of the mubarak regime was playing less and less of a role within the region. now here we have president morsi even though he's a new egyptian president and the preoccupation is primarily internal and economic, the fact is he's the one who is brokering this... >> brown: is it even more than hillary clinton. you were saying she comes in and plays this role of sort of repository, but is it more the egyptians who are the power brokers here? >> yes. brown: really? ecause the egyptians have a relationship with hamas. what's interesting, notwithstanding that this is a new egyptian government that is dominated by theÑi muslim brotherhood and the muslim brotherhood has been fundamentally hostile to israel. to recognize where they are in the region, to recognize they have to preserve the peace treaty with israel, here they are brokering between hamas and israel. it's a new role for this government but it also shows that they're pl
when there will be a need. >> suarez: with today's escalation, egypt pressed for an end to the israeli air strikes. today, palestinian president mahmoud abbas asked the arab league to call an urgent meeting to discuss the strikes, and united nations chief ban ki-moon called for a "de-escalation of tensions." >> suarez: for more, i'm joined by phone with sheera frenkel, middle east correspondent for the "times of london" in jerusalem. sheera, we reported on the rising tensions between the israelis and the palestinians in gaza. but was there something in particular that set this off? >> in the last three or four hours that there have been a slowdown in hostilities between israel and the gaza strip. in fact, earlier in today there had been no exchanges of violence across the border. but when i spoke to officials about why they decided to start targeted assassinations and launch the operation in gaza, their answer was actually intelligence data they had received that militants in gaza had been smuggling in more high tech weapons and that it would really create damage to the military arsena
, will a ceasefire become a peace? "it could," he said, "but first we need to give thanks to president morsi of egypt." across gaza, he's something of a new hero, and they're even impressed in israel. the egyptian president right now the best hope for peacekeeping here. >> egypt was able to regain it's regional role as a regional player, mediating between the israelis and the palestinians in convincing both of them to reach a ceasefire agreement. in the city, the flags, the rallies, talking up victory. in the countryside, the hamas song is, we're going to bomb tel aviv. but away from politics, what about people, lives disrupted by all this? yesterday we filmed awad and his mum sabbah taking shelter in a school in gaza city. frightened, disorientated, a severely disabled boy caught up in all this. today, diplomacy had delivered. sabbah was at home with the family in atatrah. >> it's good that we're okay. i'm very happy i can't believe it, i'm shivering. that face, sabbah said, means he's feeling happy and safe, and with an arm's round from brother mahmoud, and no sound of an explosion. >> sreenivasan:
. protesters in egypt staged nationwide rallies today against egyptian president mohamed morsi and his muslim brotherhood. in cairo, more than 100,000 people filled tahrir square to condemn morsi's decree that makes his decisions immune to judicial review. earlier, there were clashes between protesters and police. the rallies were some of the largest since the overthrow of president hosni mubarak last year. in syria, government warplanes bombed towns in the north and east, in the face of new advances by rebel fighters. in one attack, the planes dropped barrels filled with explosives and gasoline just west of idlib city. reports of the dead ranged from five to 20. the regime is using intensive air raids to try to beat back rebel gains. forensic experts took samples from the remains of yasser arafat today, hoping to determine once and for all if the late palestinian leader was poisoned. arafat died in 2004. his body was briefly exhumed today in ramallah, on the west bank. we have a report from john ray of independent television news. >> reporter: eight years after they buried him they sealed ya
, in the north, rebels said they shot down a government fighter jet with an anti- aircraft missile. in egypt, the political crisis took a new turn, as two top appellate courts went on strike against president mohammed morsi. they said they won't return to work until morsi rescinds decrees giving himself near absolute power. at the same time, the supreme constitutional court rejected morsi's claims that it's undermining his government. >> ( translated ): the egyptian supreme constitutional court will not be terrorized from any threat or blackmail and it will not be subjected to any pressure from anyone, no matter how forcible the pressure. and the supreme constitutional court is ready to face this, whatever the consequences, which could be a high price, even if the price is the life of its judges. >> sreenivasan: the courts' actions came a day after nationwide protests against morsi's decrees. and late today, there was word the egyptian leader will address the country tomorrow about his actions and the response. rebels in eastern congo have begun pulling out of territory they seized from gove
islamist president of egypt mohamed morsi denounced the israelis. and his government asked the u.s. to press for an end to the offensive. but the obama administration lined up with the israelis. state department spokesman mark toner said the u.s. believes israel has the right to defend itself. >> our position is clear that there's no justification for the violence that hamas and other terrorist organizations are employing against israel. and the onus is on them to cease their rocket attacks so that this de-escalation can take place. >> suarez: earlier, i spoke with the israeli ambassador to the united states michael oren to discuss the latest developments. ambassador, what's the latest from tel aviv? where the strikes accurate? have missiles actually hit the city and is anyone snurt >> thankfully nobody was hurt. the rockets struck in the greater tel aviv area. the alarms went off. the sirens, prime minister netanyahu was in the city at the time to a bomb shelter and now this simply means that 4.5 million israelis-- over half the population of the state of israel-- has come under
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12